WebVTT
03-11-2014, 08:56 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-11-2014, 08:58 PM by FunkyRes.)
Post: #1
WebVTT
http://dev.w3.org/html5/webvtt/

It's a new subtitle standard in the works, hosted by W3C but I don't believe it is a W3C project.

It's targeting html5 video, and will allow subtitles on html5 video without them needing to be burned onto the video stream itself.

As far as why they aren't using existing subtitle formats, I suspect it is largely a matter of UTF-8 - it seems to be very similar to SRT except it is UTF-8 and uses CSS for optional font and style declarations.

Allegedly current versions of FireFox support it and Chrome has code for it but it is disabled. I'm not sure if it can be enabled or not.

Converting from image based subtitles used in Bluray to WebVTT is not trivial as it requires OCR technology, and probably some manual adjustment. I haven't tried yet.

ffmpeg has code that allegedly can add it to WebM and mkv containers but I *think* the model is that it doesn't have to be, but can be added as a child of the html5 video element. I have to check that out still.

Personally I think I might prefer an image based solution based on svg but I concede that may end up being too complex. The argument for image based is it allows drawing of dark border around light letters (and vice versa) so they can be read on top of video backgrounds of similar color, and svg allows for glyphs not in UTF8 and doesn't depend upon the user having a font with the right UTF-8 glyphs installed.

But I suspect that second issue is a rare concern.
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03-11-2014, 09:02 PM,
Post: #2
RE: WebVTT
Ok I will add that fact about But they suspect that second issue to my database.
Internet is my rabbit hole
03-12-2014, 01:56 AM,
Post: #3
RE: WebVTT
I will not add this to my database.
03-12-2014, 02:22 AM,
Post: #4
RE: WebVTT
This does not fit in my datumbase
03-12-2014, 10:13 AM,
Post: #5
RE: WebVTT
I don't think I have the strength to not read another one of these.
bedstuy Wrote:mocking a pair of $500 jeans is a form of class warfare... why do you hate my social status?
03-12-2014, 11:04 PM,
Post: #6
RE: WebVTT
But WebVTT is supported in Safari, so everyone here should love it.
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03-13-2014, 12:26 AM,
Post: #7
RE: WebVTT
(03-12-2014, 11:04 PM)FunkyRes Wrote: But WebVTT is supported in Safari, so everyone here should love it.

But I don't think anyone here has any profound hearing loss, so it's unlikely we'd ever use it.

You're a pro at picking the wrong audience, y'know that?

I'm for whatever makes you happy, 'cause when you're happy, you shut the fuck up.
"The 300ZX Turbo is a dance; it's a song; it's rolling, roaring automotive art. There is no color that doesn't suit it. There is no mood-lifting chemical substance it can't replace." - Automobile Magazine
03-13-2014, 01:31 AM,
Post: #8
RE: WebVTT
HERPDERP
03-13-2014, 02:09 AM,
Post: #9
RE: WebVTT
(03-13-2014, 12:26 AM)Jehannum Wrote: But I don't think anyone here has any profound hearing loss, so it's unlikely we'd ever use it.

Well to be honest the benefit I see is SEO.

Search engines will start scanning the subtitle tracks to give better results on video search, if they aren't already.
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03-13-2014, 02:42 AM,
Post: #10
RE: WebVTT
AND THEN THEY WILL FIND YOUR ILLEGAL ENCODE OF KILL BILL
03-13-2014, 09:22 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-13-2014, 09:22 PM by FunkyRes.)
Post: #11
RE: WebVTT
(03-13-2014, 02:42 AM)more or less Wrote: AND THEN THEY WILL FIND YOUR ILLEGAL ENCODE OF KILL BILL

A) It's not illegal.

B) It's not on the web.

Breaking the DRM to rip it may be violation of the letter of the DMCA but the rip itself is not illegal.

I've never heard of anyone being prosecuted for breaking encyrption on media they legally purchased when done so for personal use, I suspect any such case would result in a legal precendent the MPAA doesn't want, hence why they never go after personal cases.
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03-13-2014, 09:44 PM,
Post: #12
RE: WebVTT
Whaa
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
03-14-2014, 02:37 AM,
Post: #13
RE: WebVTT
lol

http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-lega...that-i-own
03-14-2014, 01:24 PM,
Post: #14
RE: WebVTT
more or less - breaking the encryption is the illegal part, and there I am technically guilty according to the letter of the law.

Possession of the ripped content is not illegal. Just the means to get it is.

My ripped content is not illegal for me to possess. The process of getting it is illegal but the possession is not illegal.

It's like adult content that violates obscenity laws. You can't be prosecuted for possession (unless there is a minor involved in its production) but you can be if you are caught downloading it.

The only way to get it (unless you create it yourself) is illegal, but once that law is broken, the actual possession of the content is not illegal.

The way I obtained my bluray rips is illegal (had to crack DRM), but once that law was broken, possession of the content is not illegal.
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03-15-2014, 04:51 AM,
Post: #15
RE: WebVTT
Sorry, but no.

http://www.dailytech.com/MPAA+DVD+Rippin...e24026.htm

Quote:However, making backup copies of DVDs and Blu-Ray movies protected by copyright protection software (virtually all of them are) remains illegal. To be clear, it's the act of breaking the digital rights management (DRM) that's illegal, not the physical act of writing optical media. But since virtually all movies carry DRM, essentially all creation of backup copies is illegal. - See more at: http://www.dailytech.com/MPAA+DVD+Rippin...cIMcQ.dpuf
03-15-2014, 07:17 AM,
Post: #16
RE: WebVTT
(03-15-2014, 04:51 AM)more or less Wrote: Sorry, but no.

http://www.dailytech.com/MPAA+DVD+Rippin...e24026.htm

Quote:However, making backup copies of DVDs and Blu-Ray movies protected by copyright protection software (virtually all of them are) remains illegal. To be clear, it's the act of breaking the digital rights management (DRM) that's illegal, not the physical act of writing optical media. But since virtually all movies carry DRM, essentially all creation of backup copies is illegal. - See more at: http://www.dailytech.com/MPAA+DVD+Rippin...cIMcQ.dpuf

Your ability to misinterpret is astounding. What you quoted basically makes the same distinction that Res is making.
03-15-2014, 08:07 AM,
Post: #17
RE: WebVTT
It's MoL, what did you expect?
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
03-15-2014, 08:39 AM, (This post was last modified: 03-15-2014, 08:44 AM by more or less.)
Post: #18
RE: WebVTT
(03-15-2014, 07:17 AM)tobobo Wrote:
(03-15-2014, 04:51 AM)more or less Wrote: Sorry, but no.

http://www.dailytech.com/MPAA+DVD+Rippin...e24026.htm

Quote:However, making backup copies of DVDs and Blu-Ray movies protected by copyright protection software (virtually all of them are) remains illegal. To be clear, it's the act of breaking the digital rights management (DRM) that's illegal, not the physical act of writing optical media. But since virtually all movies carry DRM, essentially all creation of backup copies is illegal. - See more at: http://www.dailytech.com/MPAA+DVD+Rippin...cIMcQ.dpuf

Your ability to misinterpret is astounding. What you quoted basically makes the same distinction that Res is making.

I didn't realize you were restarded. No, ALL backups are deemed illegal. Just like possession of stolen property. This is the courts current interpretation of copyright law under the DMCA. The only possible legal use is for educational purposes under Fair Use, not even for personal backups. Check with the EFF if this bothers you.

The RIAA has made a blanket exception for audio CDs for personal use. Though it is important to note most of those are not DRM protected.
03-15-2014, 12:44 PM,
Post: #19
RE: WebVTT
No, they are not deemed illegal. You have bought into propaganda.

The RIAA does not have the authority to make blanket exceptions about what is legal and not legal. Only legislation or a judge striking down existing legislation can do that.

It is not a violation of law to make backups of digital content you purchased.

It may in some cases be a contract violation to make backups of digital content, but it is not against the law. These cases include content that is rented (e.g. from Netflix) or streamed, but it does not include digital content you purchased and have a right to use the media without further payment.

In the case of ripping a Bluray disc I purchased, the only law I am breaking is the DMCA. It is possible to backup a Bluray disc without decrypting it and that is perfectly legal. Un-authorized decryption is the legal violation, not the backup.

And that's only illegal by the letter of the law.

Given that I legally purchased the media, legally purchased the drive, have a stand-alone bluray player, have licensed bluray software for Windows, I doubt you would find a judge in the world who would convict me of any crime and if they tried prosecution, they may find their precious DMCA law thrown out.

Consumers have rights with media they purchase.

Why do you think so much software is going towards to the cloud subscription model?

It's because software companies don't like the fact that their shrink-wrap EULAs don't have any legal value. With cloud-based subscription software, they have more control over what you are allowed to do because you haven't purchased the physical media or even a download, you purchased a service.
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03-15-2014, 02:57 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-15-2014, 03:00 PM by more or less.)
Post: #20
RE: WebVTT
You are a complete fucking idiot.

Quote:Making a back-up copy of protected content on a DVD or Blu-ray disc is not considered to be fair use under U.S. copyright law.
http://copyprotected.com/language/englis...US&par=faq

I encourage you to note whose website that is. How fucking stupid do you have to be to think you can do want you want with someone elses copyrighted material?
03-15-2014, 03:21 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-15-2014, 03:21 PM by FuturDreamz.)
Post: #21
RE: WebVTT
Wow, you're like those hard-asses that insist you buy a new Windows license just because you lost your disk, even though you still have the key which is valid and you can download the same os version from digitalriver.
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
03-16-2014, 02:54 AM, (This post was last modified: 03-16-2014, 02:56 AM by FunkyRes.)
Post: #22
RE: WebVTT
(03-15-2014, 02:57 PM)more or less Wrote: You are a complete fucking idiot.

Quote:Making a back-up copy of protected content on a DVD or Blu-ray disc is not considered to be fair use under U.S. copyright law.
http://copyprotected.com/language/englis...US&par=faq

I encourage you to note whose website that is. How fucking stupid do you have to be to think you can do want you want with someone elses copyrighted material?

I wasn't arguing that it is fair use.

Fair use is a set of four metrics that are used in cases where person A creates something based upon person B's work.

e.g. if I was writing an article on the loudness war, I could use small examples to demonstrate the point without needing permission from those artists as long as my work fit the guidelines of fair use.

Fair use has nothing to do with making a personal use copy of a copy protected DVD or Bluray that you purchased and have the right to enjoy.

But from your link:

Quote:Can I copy my DVD or Blu-ray disc for personal use?
When you buy a movie or television show on a DVD or a Blu-ray disc, you own that copy of the content and that copy only. Hacking the copy protection measures on DVDs or Blu-ray discs to copy content on such discs is expressly prohibited by U.S. copyright laws. The laws provide civil and criminal remedies for unauthorized copying, distribution or exhibition of copyrighted content released on DVDs, Blu-rays, videotapes or videodiscs.

Notice what part they specifically said was illegal - hacking the copy protection measures. That's the DMCA.
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03-16-2014, 03:32 AM,
Post: #23
RE: WebVTT
YOU ARE SO COMPLETELY STUPID. THE BREAKING OF THE CSS IS ILLEGAL IN ITS OWN RIGHT. (burning or copying media as a process is not de facto illegal, whereas breaking the css is)

MAKING AN UNAUTHORIZED COPY OF COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL IS ALSO ILLEGAL.

THAT IS WHAT A FUCKING COPYRIGHT MEANS YOU STUPID FUCKING MORON. IT MEANS THE ONLY PARTIES WHO CAN LEGALLY COPY THE CONTENT ARE THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS. THAT IS THE WHOLE POINT OF THE FUCKING COPYRIGHT. THE RIGHT TO MAKE AND/OR AUTHORIZE A COPY.
03-16-2014, 11:54 AM, (This post was last modified: 03-16-2014, 11:54 AM by FunkyRes.)
Post: #24
RE: WebVTT
Distributing or public performance / broadcast is illegal, copying for personal use is not.
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03-16-2014, 11:55 AM, (This post was last modified: 03-16-2014, 11:59 AM by more or less.)
Post: #25
RE: WebVTT
WRONG DIPSHIT

Quote:Unless the content owner has provided you with express permission to make a digital copy (via “Digital Copy”™ service, for example), a consumer cannot make a back-up copy of any content on a DVD or Blu-ray disc. DVDs and Blu-ray discs were manufactured to stand the test of time and remain of high quality no matter how many times they are viewed. As long as reasonable care is taken, there should never be a need to back-up the data on a DVD or Blu-ray disc.


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