*cough*
11-26-2015, 09:38 AM,
Post: #126
RE: *cough*
http://www.zdnet.com/article/ipad-pro-ap...e-failure/
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
11-26-2015, 11:22 PM,
Post: #127
RE: *cough*
Idiot's guide to click-baiting:
  1. Identify aspect of Apple product which differs from competitors' products in category
  2. Write 500-word blurb declaring said aspect vital to product category for serious/creative/power/enterprise users, spelling doom for Apple
  3. Rely on Apple-detracting chumps to plaster links to blurb all over social media/message boards/blogosphere/interwebz
  4. PROFIT!!!!
11-29-2015, 04:55 PM,
Post: #128
RE: *cough*
Jesus, Alien. Part 3 sounds just like Potardo. Maybe he still writes his posts on a Blackberry?
12-03-2015, 05:28 AM,
Post: #129
RE: *cough*
http://mobilesyrup.com/2015/12/02/blackb...n-process/

Quote:In a initial question about his team’s goals going into the design of the Priv, DeFazio states, “Empathy is not a new philosophy or approach to design, however it can be quite easy as a designer to get caught up in aesthetics and forget about who you are designing for. We had to listen closely to what people were saying.” He then later adds, “This concept of listening to people’s needs was simple. The challenge was finding a creative way to weave it all together into a single device with a purposeful, compact, robust, user friendly and modern design.”


http://bgr.com/2015/11/27/iphone-7-rumor...hone-jack/
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
12-10-2015, 02:58 AM,
Post: #130
RE: *cough*
http://bgr.com/2015/12/09/iphone-6s-case...esign-wtf/
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
12-10-2015, 11:06 AM,
Post: #131
RE: *cough*
yeah, that case is the laughing stock. so is the apple mouse charge port.

Apple has been rich with fail lately. But the case is really bad. If the phone needs more battery, put it in the phone. Make it thicker if you have to. But holy crap why put an LED inside the damned case where no one can see it? I've wanted an LED on the iPhone exterior for a long time now so it can light up when there's a message. Now, there's potential for an LED, but wait, it's on the inside. dumb shits.
bedstuy Wrote:mocking a pair of $500 jeans is a form of class warfare... why do you hate my social status?
12-13-2015, 04:18 AM,
Post: #132
RE: *cough*
http://daringfireball.net/2015/12/the_cu...rious_case
The chaos army seems suspiciously well organized.
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12-13-2015, 07:50 AM,
Post: #133
RE: *cough*
IANRTLBS. I tried, but golly it's really LBS.

But here's the part that gets me. It wasn't long ago when Apple made a big deal about the Macbook Air's new battery design.

Remember?

So if they can put that much thought into the Air, and they can make batteries that conform to extraordinary design challenges, then there's no excuse for that new case design.
bedstuy Wrote:mocking a pair of $500 jeans is a form of class warfare... why do you hate my social status?
12-13-2015, 05:43 PM, (This post was last modified: 12-13-2015, 05:44 PM by FuturDreamz.)
Post: #134
RE: *cough*
From the article:
Quote:When should I turn on my mophie case?

To get the most charge out of your case, turn it on around 10%-20% and keep the case charging without using it until your iPhone hits 80% battery life. From there, you can either wait until it gets low again or top it off when the battery is less than 80%. Apple’s batteries fast-charge to 80%, then switch to trickle charging for the last 20%.

...I think Apple could've done that in software. When the phone recognizes a compatible battery pack is plugged in it could enter a mode where when the phone hits 20% it starts charging from the case and when it hits 80% it stops charging. Completely transparent to the user. Maybe even change the battery icon so it shows that the phone recognizes the case and will charge as needed. Simple and elegant. But it seems that Apple is having difficulty pulling off elegant simplicity nowadays.
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
12-24-2015, 07:03 AM,
Post: #135
RE: *cough*
http://gizmodo.com/everything-apple-intr...1749308570
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
12-24-2015, 10:40 AM,
Post: #136
RE: *cough*
So uh how is RIMjob's market share?
12-24-2015, 10:49 AM,
Post: #137
RE: *cough*
Up.
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
12-24-2015, 12:32 PM,
Post: #138
RE: *cough*
Compared to 5 years ago?
12-24-2015, 05:42 PM,
Post: #139
RE: *cough*
Gizmodo said something negative about Apple. Go figure.

Offered that Blackberry I found to a friend who's using the same carrier. She didn't want it.
There is no dark side of the moon, really…matter of fact, it's all dark.
12-25-2015, 09:35 AM,
Post: #140
RE: *cough*
Why are you people letting potard troll you?
Clubbie Clubbie Clubbie Clubbie Clubbie Clubbie Clubbie Clubbie ClubbieClubbieClubbie



12-25-2015, 09:40 AM,
Post: #141
RE: *cough*
The alternative is to admit they're wrong, which will be difficult after all these years.
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
12-25-2015, 09:11 PM,
Post: #142
RE: *cough*
False dichotomy.
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
01-04-2016, 07:00 AM,
Post: #143
RE: *cough*
http://arstechnica.com/business/2016/01/...have-come/ BBOS down to .3% market share. We'll see if BB can reinvent themselves and once again be relevant in enterprise.
01-05-2016, 02:58 PM,
Post: #144
RE: *cough*
http://www.techradar.com/us/news/mobile-...ok-1312015
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
01-05-2016, 11:37 PM,
Post: #145
RE: *cough*
Can I finally use a laptop to slice tomatoes?
"The 300ZX Turbo is a dance; it's a song; it's rolling, roaring automotive art. There is no color that doesn't suit it. There is no mood-lifting chemical substance it can't replace." - Automobile Magazine
01-06-2016, 12:22 AM,
Post: #146
RE: *cough*
"Our flagship product's crowning achievement is that it compares favourably to Apple's lowest-tier offering."

[Image: participant_ribbons_1.jpg]
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
ClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbieClubbie
01-06-2016, 02:22 PM,
Post: #147
RE: *cough*
http://www.zdnet.com/article/why-the-new...-me-crazy/
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
01-06-2016, 04:31 PM,
Post: #148
RE: *cough*
Author clearly has no clue what he's talking about. I really should have stopped reading when he was intentionally wrong with the Siri remote being the only game in town, but I'm a glutton for punishment (same reason I keep visiting this thread).

"[T]here's no alternative – you're stuck using [the Siri remote], whether you like it or not." No. Just flat-out, ignorantly wrong. The old aluminum remote still works for most navigation (as does my Harmony remote, which was programmed with the previous Apple TV in mind), and there's the Remote app on iOS. For the Remote app functionality, I had to update my Apple TV right out of the box, but that can be expected. Plus, all of my account info transferred over from my iPhone during setup, when I held my iPhone within Bluetooth range of the new Apple TV (I'd never had a chance to do this before, and thought it was pretty friggin' cool). Strike one.

Orientation of the remote. For the first few times, I got this wrong. The way to differentiate: the top (touch surface) is matte; the bottom is glossy. They physically feel different. If your thumb is touching a glossy surface, rotate it 180º. The volume buttons are also connected, like a rocker switch, whereas the Siri and play/pause button aren't. Make sure the big long button is on the right. And since you have to wake the remote from sleep before using it, chances are you'll press a button, and you'll know whether or not you've got it oriented properly. Strike two.

Text entry. The straight line of letters isn't the best, and I miss pressing play/pause to change between caps, lowercase, and numbers, but if I need to type a lot, I'll use the Remote app. Also, neat tip I saw elsewhere: waking the new Apple TV with the old aluminum remote (or, in my case, my Harmony remote) will trigger the old grid-style keyboard. All that said, speech-to-text transcription would be nice to have, and I've just sent it to Apple as a suggestion. In this case, we'll just call it a foul tip.

Trackpad sensitivity. There's a setting for that in the Settings app. If he'd taken half a minute to look in the app, he'd have found it. Strike three.

Your cat sat on the remote and it woke you up? Okay, you're just a fucking moron. Put the remote in a drawer or something, or keep your fatass cats off the damn furniture. But I'm calling utter bullshit on this one: pressing the touch surface (or any of the buttons) takes some doing, and I doubt a cat's ass (or any other part of it) could land on the touch surface button precisely enough to activate it. Now, if the cat pressed on the Siri button and told the Apple TV to start playing Dexter…I think you might have bigger problems, mate. But I still think it's bullshit. Strike…four?

Oh, he contradicts himself several paragraphs down and finally mentions the updated Remote app. But I thought you said "[t]here's no alternative, and that I was "stuck using [the Siri remote], whether you like it or not." Oh, wait…you did. Guess I'm not so stuck after all. Strike…five???

Guy's a troll. I've had my Apple TV hooked up for about a week now, and I'm loving it. Wish there were more apps for it, and that more of those apps supported universal search (YouTube, I'm looking in your direction), but that's my only real complaint so far.
There is no dark side of the moon, really…matter of fact, it's all dark.
01-06-2016, 05:29 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-06-2016, 05:31 PM by FuturDreamz.)
Post: #149
RE: *cough*
(01-06-2016, 04:31 PM)Skippy Wrote: Author clearly has no clue what he's talking about. I really should have stopped reading when he was intentionally wrong with the Siri remote being the only game in town, but I'm a glutton for punishment (same reason I keep visiting this thread).
sure.

Quote:"[T]here's no alternative – you're stuck using [the Siri remote], whether you like it or not." No. Just flat-out, ignorantly wrong. The old aluminum remote still works for most navigation (as does my Harmony remote, which was programmed with the previous Apple TV in mind), and there's the Remote app on iOS. For the Remote app functionality, I had to update my Apple TV right out of the box, but that can be expected. Plus, all of my account info transferred over from my iPhone during setup, when I held my iPhone within Bluetooth range of the new Apple TV (I'd never had a chance to do this before, and thought it was pretty friggin' cool). Strike one.
The Siri remote is still the lowers common denominator of available remotes, and is most likely to be the one used by many households. People may choose to keep the old remote with their original ATV (whether to sell or relocate or store), and pairing the remote app might be unknown or beyond some households. I'm not aware how the remote app is affected by the ATV and iPhone being connected to different Apple IDs.

Quote:Orientation of the remote. For the first few times, I got this wrong. The way to differentiate: the top (touch surface) is matte; the bottom is glossy. They physically feel different. If your thumb is touching a glossy surface, rotate it 180º. The volume buttons are also connected, like a rocker switch, whereas the Siri and play/pause button aren't. Make sure the big long button is on the right. And since you have to wake the remote from sleep before using it, chances are you'll press a button, and you'll know whether or not you've got it oriented properly. Strike two.
That sounds complicated, especially compared to remotes where the orientation can be identified visually in low light conditions. over time I assume that the "matte" and "glossy" sides will become more difficult to distinguish if the remote has been subjected to abuse and greasy fingers. I rather not have to run down a quick tactile checklist or look closely at the remote just because I wish to quickly pause the movie. The fact that I would have to "wake" the remote may cause some confusion for a moment, which can cause a minor annoyance of the remote not doing anything or recognizing two different clicks.

Quote:Text entry. The straight line of letters isn't the best, and I miss pressing play/pause to change between caps, lowercase, and numbers, but if I need to type a lot, I'll use the Remote app. Also, neat tip I saw elsewhere: waking the new Apple TV with the old aluminum remote (or, in my case, my Harmony remote) will trigger the old grid-style keyboard. All that said, speech-to-text transcription would be nice to have, and I've just sent it to Apple as a suggestion. In this case, we'll just call it a foul tip.
Fair enough. Speech recognition is and will probably always be finicky though.

Quote:Trackpad sensitivity. There's a setting for that in the Settings app. If he'd taken half a minute to look in the app, he'd have found it. Strike three.
One: not every user will be aware of the setting and will not even consider that it might exist they will simply consider it as something that have to live with or the reason to not use the ATV. Two: The trackpad sensitivity will inherently be affected by conditions such as the user's finger cleanliness and coverings, and maybe the environment such as humidity. I do not know if any affects would be noticeable however.

Quote:Your cat sat on the remote and it woke you up? Okay, you're just a fucking moron. Put the remote in a drawer or something, or keep your fatass cats off the damn furniture. But I'm calling utter bullshit on this one: pressing the touch surface (or any of the buttons) takes some doing, and I doubt a cat's ass (or any other part of it) could land on the touch surface button precisely enough to activate it. Now, if the cat pressed on the Siri button and told the Apple TV to start playing Dexter…I think you might have bigger problems, mate. But I still think it's bullshit. Strike…four?
Do you keep your remotes in a drawer? That's something you will keep on hand and visible, lest you forget where it is. A standard infrared remote would most likely have stiffer buttons and an obstructed line of sight and so wouldn't do anything. I do not own a cat nor do I know how they would interact with the remotes, but if they were to than a touch-sensitive Bluetooth remote would be more likely to send random commands to the tv. The Author never said how the Apple TV was left before they went to bed. Perhaps it was just paused or left on Netflix.

Quote:Oh, he contradicts himself several paragraphs down and finally mentions the updated Remote app. But I thought you said "[t]here's no alternative, and that I was "stuck using [the Siri remote], whether you like it or not." Oh, wait…you did. Guess I'm not so stuck after all. Strike…five???
The remote app isn't exactly a proper replacement. For one, your guests and family members would need to have their own iDevices paired or use one of yours. If you need to pause the movie quickly (like if you just got an important phone call), you might be having to quickly unlock your phone and launch the remote app. What happens if you're taking a call on your iPhone and you or someone wants to browse Netflix to find the next show?
It is an alternative, but not a proper replacement.

Quote:Guy's a troll. I've had my Apple TV hooked up for about a week now, and I'm loving it. Wish there were more apps for it, and that more of those apps supported universal search (YouTube, I'm looking in your direction), but that's my only real complaint so far.
You have to remember you're relatively tech savvy and have a general understanding how Apple makes things. Not everyone is at that level or even close. My own mother was forced to reset her AppleID password every month when she had an iPhone and wanted to install updates or a new app (something to do with satellite internet is my understanding), and my dad was unable to use the Macbook I bought from one of you guys for nearly a whole year until I was able to come over and get the wifi password. Sure all of these detailed arguments of yours are true for you and would be applicable to like-minded people, but many (not all, of course) people use Apple products because it is expected to "Just Work" with minimal re-learning and complications. Learning the Siri remote can be much more of a challenge for them with a bit more confusion, caution, and tediousness that could've been solved by a solution they are not aware of or just don't trust.
My logic is infallible. Resistance is futile.
01-06-2016, 06:33 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-06-2016, 06:36 PM by Skippy.)
Post: #150
RE: *cough*
(01-06-2016, 05:29 PM)FuturDreamz Wrote:
(01-06-2016, 04:31 PM)Skippy Wrote: Author clearly has no clue what he's talking about. I really should have stopped reading when he was intentionally wrong with the Siri remote being the only game in town, but I'm a glutton for punishment (same reason I keep visiting this thread).
sure.

Quote:"[T]here's no alternative – you're stuck using [the Siri remote], whether you like it or not." No. Just flat-out, ignorantly wrong. The old aluminum remote still works for most navigation (as does my Harmony remote, which was programmed with the previous Apple TV in mind), and there's the Remote app on iOS. For the Remote app functionality, I had to update my Apple TV right out of the box, but that can be expected. Plus, all of my account info transferred over from my iPhone during setup, when I held my iPhone within Bluetooth range of the new Apple TV (I'd never had a chance to do this before, and thought it was pretty friggin' cool). Strike one.
The Siri remote is still the lowers common denominator of available remotes, and is most likely to be the one used by many households. People may choose to keep the old remote with their original ATV (whether to sell or relocate or store), and pairing the remote app might be unknown or beyond some households. I'm not aware how the remote app is affected by the ATV and iPhone being connected to different Apple IDs.

For the Remote app to work, they have to be using the same Apple ID for Home Sharing. I have different accounts set up for Home Sharing, iCloud, and iTunes purchases and Game Center, and the setup assistant was able to properly pull each one from my iPhone.

As well, I was just reminded of the setting to use another remote in Settings, under Remotes. Like the previous generation, this Apple TV can learn codes from unused buttons on other remotes, so even a cheap $10 unit from the drug store should work just fine. 

Quote:
Quote:Orientation of the remote. For the first few times, I got this wrong. The way to differentiate: the top (touch surface) is matte; the bottom is glossy. They physically feel different. If your thumb is touching a glossy surface, rotate it 180º. The volume buttons are also connected, like a rocker switch, whereas the Siri and play/pause button aren't. Make sure the big long button is on the right. And since you have to wake the remote from sleep before using it, chances are you'll press a button, and you'll know whether or not you've got it oriented properly. Strike two.
That sounds complicated, especially compared to remotes where the orientation can be identified visually in low light conditions. over time I assume that the "matte" and "glossy" sides will become more difficult to distinguish if the remote has been subjected to abuse and greasy fingers. I rather not have to run down a quick tactile checklist or look closely at the remote just because I wish to quickly pause the movie. The fact that I would have to "wake" the remote may cause some confusion for a moment, which can cause a minor annoyance of the remote not doing anything or recognizing two different clicks.

I can personally also feel the delineation between the two surfaces on the thin edge of the remote. I doubt the materials will "wear" to that extent (I'm sure some people's might); I haven't experienced any wear on my MacBook Air's trackpad in over three years of usage, and since there's nothing on the bottom, glossy half of the remote, I can't see any wear happening there, either. If your hands are filthy enough that you could cause damage to your devices simply by touching them, might I suggest investing in a napkin? Finally, I suppose you'd rather the remote not go to sleep and the associated battery drain that comes along with that. I've gotten into the habit of picking it up and pressing the touch surface button to wake the remote, thus helping with orientation issues.

Quote:
Quote:Text entry. The straight line of letters isn't the best, and I miss pressing play/pause to change between caps, lowercase, and numbers, but if I need to type a lot, I'll use the Remote app. Also, neat tip I saw elsewhere: waking the new Apple TV with the old aluminum remote (or, in my case, my Harmony remote) will trigger the old grid-style keyboard. All that said, speech-to-text transcription would be nice to have, and I've just sent it to Apple as a suggestion. In this case, we'll just call it a foul tip.
Fair enough. Speech recognition is and will probably always be finicky though.

I talk to Siri like I speak to my hard-of-hearing mother: clearly, and often times slower than I would normally speak. She almost always understands me (Siri, not my mother). That said, Siri is probably the best basic speech recognition I've used; the speech recognition in my car, designed by Microsoft, is a moron by comparison.

Quote:
Quote:Trackpad sensitivity. There's a setting for that in the Settings app. If he'd taken half a minute to look in the app, he'd have found it. Strike three.
One: not every user will be aware of the setting and will not even consider that it might exist they will simply consider it as something that have to live with or the reason to not use the ATV. Two: The trackpad sensitivity will inherently be affected by conditions such as the user's finger cleanliness and coverings, and maybe the environment such as humidity. I do not know if any affects would be noticeable however.

Familiarize yourself with the Settings app. Apple has made available an extended manual in the iBooks Store. And wipe your freakin' hands already.

Quote:
Quote:Your cat sat on the remote and it woke you up? Okay, you're just a fucking moron. Put the remote in a drawer or something, or keep your fatass cats off the damn furniture. But I'm calling utter bullshit on this one: pressing the touch surface (or any of the buttons) takes some doing, and I doubt a cat's ass (or any other part of it) could land on the touch surface button precisely enough to activate it. Now, if the cat pressed on the Siri button and told the Apple TV to start playing Dexter…I think you might have bigger problems, mate. But I still think it's bullshit. Strike…four?
Do you keep your remotes in a drawer? That's something you will keep on hand and visible, lest you forget where it is. A standard infrared remote would most likely have stiffer buttons and an obstructed line of sight and so wouldn't do anything. I do not own a cat nor do I know how they would interact with the remotes, but if they were to than a touch-sensitive Bluetooth remote would be more likely to send random commands to the tv. The Author never said how the Apple TV was left before they went to bed. Perhaps it was just paused or left on Netflix.

As a matter of fact, I do keep my remotes in a drawer (except when charging them, which only happens overnight). That way, I always know where they are when I'm not using them, and it makes them harder for my five– and four-year old nieces to find when they come to visit. The remote is not merely touch-sensitive; it needs pressure to activate on the touch surface or on any of the buttons. But again, stick the remote in a drawer if you don't want your pets, nieces, or whomever fucking with it.

Quote:
Quote:Oh, he contradicts himself several paragraphs down and finally mentions the updated Remote app. But I thought you said "[t]here's no alternative, and that I was "stuck using [the Siri remote], whether you like it or not." Oh, wait…you did. Guess I'm not so stuck after all. Strike…five???
The remote app isn't exactly a proper replacement. For one, your guests and family members would need to have their own iDevices paired or use one of yours. If you need to pause the movie quickly (like if you just got an important phone call), you might be having to quickly unlock your phone and launch the remote app. What happens if you're taking a call on your iPhone and you or someone wants to browse Netflix to find the next show?
It is an alternative, but not a proper replacement.

The author clearly stated at the beginning of the article, "[t]here's no alternative." That's an absolute. Even you consider the Remote app an alternative. The author is simply wrong; that he contradicts his absolute statement later in the article suggests he's being intentionally thick. I'm not advocating the Remote app as a full replacement (Siri is incredibly useful), but it does count as an alternative. As is an aluminum Apple remote, which is still sold for about twenty bucks. As is an older white plastic Apple remote, of which I have two or three floating around the house. As is using a universal remote programmed to control an Apple TV, such as my Harmony remote. As is a "universal" cheapie drug store special, programmed using the Remote section of the Settings app. And it's my Apple TV: my guests and family members won't be controlling it while I'm there. If I have to leave, I'll pass it off to someone else (oriented the right way, of course). But my original point stands: he stated an absolute, then contradicted himself later on. 

Quote:
Quote:Guy's a troll. I've had my Apple TV hooked up for about a week now, and I'm loving it. Wish there were more apps for it, and that more of those apps supported universal search (YouTube, I'm looking in your direction), but that's my only real complaint so far.
You have to remember you're relatively tech savvy and have a general understanding how Apple makes things. Not everyone is at that level or even close. My own mother was forced to reset her AppleID password every month when she had an iPhone and wanted to install updates or a new app (something to do with satellite internet is my understanding), and my dad was unable to use the Macbook I bought from one of you guys for nearly a whole year until I was able to come over and get the wifi password. Sure all of these detailed arguments of yours are true for you and would be applicable to like-minded people, but many (not all, of course) people use Apple products because it is expected to "Just Work" with minimal re-learning and complications. Learning the Siri remote can be much more of a challenge for them with a bit more confusion, caution, and tediousness that could've been solved by a solution they are not aware of or just don't trust.

I would assume this author would be tech savvy, writing for a tech website and all, but after reading his article, my conclusion is he can't be. Simple common sense (which I'm finding none too common nowadays) would solve some of these issues. For example, changing behaviours: if my pet is sitting on my remote and activating it, perhaps I should change my own behaviours to prevent this, such as putting the remote in a drawer. This is very similar to when I had my first dog, and she'd pull my dirty underwear out of the laundry in the corner (weird dog); the solution was, surprisingly enough, to not have my gitch within the dog's reach. If you're worried about Chee-tos residue ruining your remote, wash your hands once in a while. If you're getting the orientation mixed up on a regular basis, try making sure you always point it in a certain direction (i.e. pointing at the Apple TV) when you put it away, so when you pick it up, it's already pointing the right way. Apple makes it pretty logical, but the user has to be a willing participant in learning how to use something. It's easy for someone to put the blame on the designer, but like my underwear story, sometimes the problem is our own behaviours, that may require some effort to correct or to adapt to a new device.


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